TROJAN DUB BOX SET (TRBCD002) - THE DEVELOPMENT OF DUB on record can be traced back to the late sixties. It was then that producers, such as Edward 'Bunnie' Lee, Joe Gibbs and Lee Perry began issuing singles with instrumental 'versions' on the flip of vocal releases. At first the vocal track featured on the A-side of the single would be removed, leaving the basic rhythm track, onto which further instrumentation or DJ accompaniment could be added. By 1970, releasing versions on B-sides of singles was widespread among all of Kingston's major producers, although by this time the practice had developed one stage further. Additional embellishment of the recording once the vocals had been completely or partially removed was usually deemed unnecessary and increasingly B-sides of singles presented the basic rhythm track alone.

'Versions' developed little over the next year or so and it was not until around the end of 1972 that Dub in it's truest sense came into being. The man chiefly responsible for it's development was pioneering engineer, Osbourne Ruddock, who by now had come to be known as King Tubby. After receiving an education in electronics, Tubby launched his Home Town Hi-Fi sound System in the early sixties and after creating an amplifier capable of playing music louder and clearer than anyone around his local neighbourhood of Waterhouse, he became the leading operator in the area. The popularity of his sound system was further increased following the enlistment of U Roy as his regular deejay. At his small studio at the back of his home, Tubby then began creating special mixes of popular recordings which were devoid of the vocal track, thus enabling U Roy to toast over the rhythm unhindered. Around 1970, the idea was put into commercial practice when Duke Reid recorded the deejay toasting over a number of his best known Rocksteady rhythms. Reid subsequently issued the tracks and their enormous success led to the style being widely copied by producers throughout Kingston, with deejays such as Dennis Alcapone, I Roy and Big Youth all making their mark over the next year or so.

Throughout this early period, Tubby continued to experiment, dropping sections of the rhythm and vocal track in and out of the mix, while using separate tweeter boxes and custom reverb and echo units to create wild new sounds. When he acquired the old four-track desk from Dynamic Studio, his services were increasingly called upon by local performers who began issuing his mixes as 'Dubs'. Meanwhile, other engineers - most notably Errol Thompson at Randy's studio and Sylvian Morris who worked at Harry J and Studio One - also began their own experimentation with sound, developing the style further.

Throughout the remainder of the seventies, Dub music thrived and towards the end of the decade, a new wave of engineers such as Hopeton Brown (aka Scientist), Lloyd James (aka Prince Jammy) and 'Prince' Phillip Smart, pushed it's boundaries to new limits. By the mid eighties, however, the sound was on the wane. For the next couple of years it remained on the periphery of Jamaican music, but early the following decade, a new generation of musicians and producers breathed new life into the genre and it's popularity has since steadily grown.

This set brings together fifty heavy Dub sounds from the mid-seventies to the early eighties and features a selection of killer rhythms from some of Kingston's leading session crews and mixed by Dubmasters such as the great King Tubby, his talented protégé Scientist and the incomparable Lee 'Scratch' Perry. If you have yet to discover the wonderful, mind-blowing world of Dub, you could wish for no finer introduction than this truly superlative collection.

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Marijuana
Sly & The Revolutionaries
Storming The Death Star
Roots Radics Band
Public Eyes
Gregory Isaacs
Love Of Jah Jah Children
The GG All Stars
A Dancing Version
Tommy McCook & The Aggrovators
Miss Know It All
Scientist
Rebel Dance
The Observer All Stars
Dubbing Sandra
The Upsetters
King Tubby's Conversation Dub
King Tubby
A Crabbit Version
The Aggrovators
White Rum
Sly & The Revolutionaries
Mission Impossible
Roots Radics Band
Leggo Beast
Gregory Isaacs
Dubbin & Wailin
Velvet Shadows
Rema Dub
The Observer All Stars
Long Time Dub
The Upsetters
A Version I Can Feel With Love
Tommy McCook & The Aggrovators

King Tubby's Explosion Dub
King Tubby
Cocaine
Sly & The Revolutioaries
The Death Of Mr Spock
Roots Radics Band
Nigger
Gregory Isaacs
Right Road To Dubland
The Jahlights
Jah Jah Dub
The Aggrovators
Rasta Locks
The Observers
Dub Dat
The Upsetters
The Gorgon Of Dubs & Horns
Tommy McCook & The Aggrovators
King Tubby's Patient Dub
King Tubby
Black Ash
Sly & The Revolutionaries
The Son Of Darth Vadar
Roots Radics Band
Slum
Gregory Isaacs
Do You Dub
The Aggrovators
Mosquito Dub
GG All Stars
Dubbing With The Observer - The Observers
Rock Me In Dub
Thompsons All Stars

Freedom Dub
The Upsetters
A Gigantic Dub
Tommy McCook & The Aggrovators
Collie
Sly & The Revolutionaries
Tam Tam
Gregory Isaacs
Turntable Dub
The Observers
Scientist Ganja Dub
Scientist
Dub On My Pillow
The Aggrovators
Herb
Sly & The Revolutionaries
The Alien Aborts
The Roots Radics Band
Leaving
Gregory Isaacs
Dread Dub
Lloyds All Stars
Sir Niney's Rock
The Observers
The Big Boss Of Dubs
Tommy McCook & The Aggrovators
Dub So
The Upsetters
King Tubby's Badness Dub
King Tubby
African Dub
The Silvertones

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Time - 55:52

Time - 55:44

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